In a Vase on Monday: North Georgia Mountains

(c) Terri Robertson, T’s Southern Garden 2018

Today I’m posting from my family home on Pinnacle Mountain, just outside the quaint town of Clayton, Georgia.

It’s a sisters’ long weekend, and we’re about to head out to lunch, so I’ll make this quick!

The vase is the bottom part of a covered glass dish purchased at a nearby flea market. I’ve filled it with:

  • Berries—perhaps young wild blackberries
  • Daylilies
  • Pine branches
  • Queen Anne’s lace
  • Roses

To the either side of the vase, I placed:

  • Bark—covered with lichen and moss
  • Mountain laurel branch—dead, covered with lichen and moss
  • Rhododendron—foliage and bud
  • Rocks found on various family hikes

Thanks to Cathy and her blog, Rambling in the Garden, for hosting the IAVOM meme. It’s helped me connect to other garden bloggers and makes blogging much more enjoyable. Be sure to visit her post today (she has a nice rustic vase featuring Allium christophii) and the comments section to see what other gardeners around the world have put in a vase on Monday.

(c) Terri Robertson, T’s Southern Garden 2018

Thanks for stopping by! Please come again.

In the Garden with Rachel: Daylilies and Hydrangeas

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden Blog 2018

To properly represent late May blooms in Alabama on this blog, I visited my friend Rachel a couple of weeks ago. She grows daylilies and hydrangeas, which I don’t have in my own yard.

As I made the hour drive from Birmingham to Tuscaloosa, I was worried the weather wasn’t going to cooperate. But after a short storm, the skies cleared for a lovely evening of wine, appetizers and catching up on the patio.

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden Blog 2018

I timed my visit to catch the hydrangeas at their peak. Aren’t they gorgeous? I love how some pink shows through the blue in the blooms below.

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden Blog 2018

The mass a daylilies sweeping along the curve of the patio was an unexpected bonus to my trip. Rachel shared that when they moved in, the daylilies were scattered about the yard. They dug them up and replanted them en masse for a grand statement.

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden Blog 2018
This is Roper, a cocker spaniel. He was in constant motion during my visit, but Rachel plied him with treats so I could capture him in portrait.

A single bright red-orange lily stands out among the others. This was a gift from Rachel’s late mother-in-law. When they moved, they dug it up and took it with them to their new home.

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden Blog 2018

Next, we headed to the circle garden, which is divided into quadrants. (Roper came along to help.)

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden Blog 2018There the lilies are divided into groups based on bloom time. This beauty was showing off, raindrops and all.

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden Blog 2018

I hope you enjoyed this visit to Rachel’s garden as much as I did. Please stop by again soon! Tomorrow, I’ll post for In a Vase on Monday from the mountains of Clayton, Georgia.

In a Vase on Monday: Succulents

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden 2018I’m in between summer and spring blooming seasons, so today’s In A Vase on Monday post is a pot of succulents.

This week I wrote a story about succulents for a local digital media outlet called Bham Now. The research for that story flowed over into real life, and brought me a great deal of tiny garden joy. This stoneware planter, a $2 estate-sale find, did not make the article, but I’m sharing it with you now.

Ripple jade

The tall plant in the center is ripple jade (Crassula arborescens subsp. undulatifolia). I thought it was a steal for $3.95 at Oak Street Garden Shop in Birmingham, Alabama. Something about the shape and watery green color of the leaves is mesmerizing.

Oak Street Garden Shop maintains a community pollinator garden outside its shop in Crestline Village. (Nothing to do with succulents, of course, but I had to include it.) The owner tells me that goldfinches feast there in the morning, in addition to the bees and butterflies who visit all day.

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden 2018
Black-eyed Susans are the stars of this pollinator garden in June. Seedlings of zinnias and cosmos are popping up among the fading larkspur and bachelor buttons, which are going to seed.
Peperomia prostrata

The plant spilling over the side to the back-right is Peperomia prostrata. I bought a tiny pot for $5.95 at the same shop, and I divided it among three different planters.

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden 2018

Single-leaf propagations

The two tiniest plants in my pot of succulents are the result of single-leaf propagation. I don’t know the names of the specific varieties, unfortunately. These baby succulents are 8 months old, starting from the date I snapped off the parent leaves.

 

Propagated cuttings

The remaining two plants in the stoneware planter are propagated cuttings (I do not have a record of the plants’ names). Below is one of the original plants, which is in bloom at the moment.

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden 2018

Thanks to Cathy and her blog, Rambling in the Garden, for hosting the IAVOM meme. Check out her lovely offering today of sweet peas, cosmos and grasses, and visit the comments section to see what other gardeners around the world have put in a vase on Monday.

Walk in Avondale Park: a Great Blue Heron Takes Flight

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden Blog, Avondale Park, Birmingham, Alabama, blue heron

A great blue heron is a fairly common sight at Avondale Park, a 40-acre public park in Birmingham, Alabama.

There are tasty little fish for a heron to eat in the spring water-fed pond. A small island at the pond’s center provides a human-free respite in this urban park. The natural spring has attracted locals and travelers to the area since pre-Civil War days (and Native Americans long before that).

Birmingham, Alabama, Avondale Park
Vintage postcard showing Avondale Park c. 1911 via Bhamwiki

In the 1930s, the city added a stone amphitheater designed by landscape architect Rubee Pearse. The spring flows from the depths of a cave, but unfortunately for any spelunkers out there, the city’s 1930s improvements included blocking the cave entrance. In 2012, the park installed baseball diamonds and restrooms along with other renovations. 

After a recent lunch at Avondale’s Taco Morro Loco (so good!), a friend and I took a stroll around the pond. There were lots of ducks and one solitary blue heron. I approached him slowly, snapping photos with each step. Then he took off.

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden Blog, Avondale Park, Birmingham, Alabama, blue heron

Check out the water trail as he lifts himself from the water.

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden Blog, Avondale Park, Birmingham, Alabama, blue heronJust one more big lift…

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden Blog, Avondale Park, Birmingham, Alabama, blue heron

And then he sails. How beautiful nature is.

In a Vase on Monday: Sweet Gardenias

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018

The guest room smells amazing today thanks to the small vase of gardenias clipped for today’s In a Vase on Monday post.

Frostproof gardenias (Gardenia jasminoides)

I’ve written before about the drought that claimed quite a few of my plants and shrubs in 2016-17. I dragged my feet about replanting shrubs in the largest front bed, but I finally got the job done this year. I opted for a frostproof variety of gardenias, which are full sun and drought tolerant. The bushes started flowering last week, and they smell ever so nice. Gardenias have a heavy, sweet scent, but it’s not overpowering.

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
A gardenia in bloom. Ahhhh, breathe it in.

Colorwheel, aka Stokes’ Aster (Stokesia laevis)

The colorwheel bloom in last week’s post got a couple of comments, so this time I’m including a photo of new versus old blooms. The palest bloom opened most recently; the others have darkened with age.

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
Colorwheel, aka Stoke’s aster, blooms deepen in color with age.

“Hot Lips” sage (Salvia x jamensis) 

The small white flowers tipped in red are “Hot Lips” sage or saliva. A couple of varieties of perennial salvia are shown in the photo below. I’ve caught a glimpse of a ruby throated hummingbird a few times this spring—apparently they love salvia!

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
Salvia = hummingbird magnet

Thanks to Cathy and her blog, Rambling in the Garden, for hosting the IAVOM meme. It’s helped me connect to other garden bloggers and makes blogging much more enjoyable. Be sure to visit her blog and the comments section to see what she and other gardeners around the world have put in a vase on Monday.

 

In a Vase on Monday: Kangaroo Colorwheel

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018

Last week, I noticed a few garden bloggers chose fun animal vases for In a Vase on Monday. This week, I follow suit.

Kangaroo Vase

This vintage Fitz & Floyd piece is actually a toothbrush holder. As a vase, the holes meant for toothbrush handles function like a flower frog, helping stems stay in place. This is not the first time this estate-sale find has appeared on my blog, but it is its first appearance since I began posting for IAVOM, hosted by Cathy at Rambling in the Garden.

Colorwheel, aka Stokes’ Aster (Stokesia laevis)

The pastel, almost white bloom by the kangaroo face is the very first offering from my Stoke’s Aster this season. This perennial, full-sun plant is native to the Southeastern United States. It earns the nickname Colorwheel from the changing color of its blooms, which begin as the palest pink-purple and age to a deep mauve.

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
An overhead view offers a closer look at the Stoke’s Aster bloom (bottom left).

Rounding out the colorwheel: repeat bloomers

The rest of the blooms in this vase have already appeared in various posts this year, and you will probably continue to see them in my vases through the summer.

  • The spindly brown stems bearing tiny white flowers are heuchera ‘Mocha’ also known as coral bells.
  • The clusters of small purple flowers are lavender (Lavandula angustiflolia).
  • With a truly ice-like shimmer, the neon violet flowers are ice plant (Delosperma cooperi).
  • The violet, cone-shaped clusters are butterfly bush (Buddleja), and speaking of …

The butterfly bush below our kitchen window went from one single bloom last week to full-blast flowering this week. Bring on the butterflies!

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
Butterfly bush

More animal vases

Last week, posts from these bloggers inspired my kangaroo creation.

  • Wild Daffodil, hailing from the other side of the Atlantic on England’s south coast, featured zebra and giraffe vases.
  • In Florida, the Shrub Queen arranged native wildflowers in a cow vase and introduced us to a sweet real-life pup.
  • Bonney Lassie, of Washington state, has a fish vase that I adore.

More In a Vase on Monday

Visit Rambling in the Garden to see what Cathy and gardeners around the world have put in a vase this Monday. Thank you for stopping by!