In a Vase on Monday: Zinnias

(c) Terri Robertson, T’s Southern Garden 2018
Zinnias and buddleja, aka butterfly bush

My offering for this In a Vase on Monday post is small but cheerful.

The vase is an old pharmacy bottle that was dug up in Florida. The decades spent in the earth imparted a milky patina to the aqua glass. I found it at Dogwoods in Clayton, Georgia, over the 4th of July weekend. Now on to the flowers.

Profusion double-bloom zinnias (3 blooms on right): I purchased this petite variety at Shoppe in Forest Park. I love this shop’s urban location in a charming old bungalow. It’s built into a terraced hillside, so you meander up a shady hillside as you peruse the outdoor tables of plants.

Dwarf zinnia: This one’s the bright orange bloom on the left. I planted a seed packet of these, but unfortunately I was careless and let all but two seedlings get zapped by the sun. So this guy is a survivor!

Giant zinnia: It’s not in the vase because I couldn’t bear to cut the first bloom, but I wanted to share it. I planted giant zinnias from seed last year, and they reseeded themselves this year – what a nice surprise! I’m not sure of the exact variety (maybe California giants), but they get as tall as me!

(c) Terri Robertson, T’s Southern Garden 2018
Giant zinnia

You’ll notice that a couple the zinnia blooms in my vase show signs of age. Someone once told me that zinnias go by the nickname old maids. I’ve always like that. Zinnia’s are still pretty and attract plenty of pollinators long after they’ve earned a few age spots.

Buddleja (also spelled Buddleia): To finish off the arrangment, I snipped a stem from my Buddleja, commonly known as butterfly bush. I previously posted a vase with Buddleja here.

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A common buckeye butterfly visiting the Buddleja bush last September.

Thanks to Cathy and her blog, Rambling in the Garden, for hosting the IAVOM meme. She has a vase of moody blues and purples today. Please give her a visit, and don’t forget to check out the comments following her post to see offerings from gardeners around the world.

Also, a bit of good news. My friend Kara invited me to share on her blog, Inspired Southerner, so you can catch my garden posts there too.

In a Vase on Monday: Big, Beautiful Lily

(c) Terri Robertson, T’s Southern Garden 2018
Asiatic lily, hummingbird mint, dusty miller, sedum and creeping Jenny

This spring, I planted a bargain variety pack of shade bulbs and roots. The big, beautiful Asiatic lily in this vase is the summer payoff.

It’s the only flower so far, but perennials can take a couple of years to put on a show. (And I probably could have taken more care in preparing the soil before planting.) Now, for the rest.

Creeping Jenny

(c) Terri Robertson, T’s Southern Garden 2018

I love creeping Jenny and the dimension it brings to vases. It’s easy to dig up and transplant, and it comes back every year. From late spring to the first killing freeze of winter, it cascades over our terrace walls and softens the edges of the austere concrete blocks.

“Apache Sunset” hummingbird mint (Agastache rupestris)

(c) Terri Robertson, T’s Southern Garden 2018

I’m pleased with how big and bountiful this perennial has become in its second year in my garden. Hummingbird mint is said to attract hummingbirds, but I haven’t exactly been watching for them. It’s hot as Hades outside, and we’ve had monsoon-like rains.

Dusty miller

(c) Terri Robertson, T’s Southern Garden 2018

Dusty miller is one of those plants that’s so ubiquitous in gardens (at least in the Southeastern U.S. where I live) that it’s easy to dismiss. But I must give credit where credit is due. It’s a hardy perennial, and the white, waxy foliage really highlights the lily.

Sedum

(c) Terri Robertson, T’s Southern Garden 2018

The sedum is a “passalong” from my dad. I wish I knew the variety. Like the creeping Jenny, it’s a perennial saving grace for the concrete block terraces. Planted in the openings along the top, it propagates easily and comes back every year.

Vase and props

I inherited the vintage glass creamer (the vase) from my aunt. It could be a family piece, or perhaps she scouted a deal for 25 cents at a flea market, as she was so good at doing. For the photo, I added a vintage brass finial and a small woodblock painting by Moni Hill, which my sister bought for me at the Main Street Gallery in Clayton, Georgia. There’s a quote on the side of the painting, too.

(c) Terri Robertson, T’s Southern Garden 2018

Thanks to Cathy and her blog, Rambling in the Garden, for hosting the IAVOM meme. She has a sunny vase of zinnias, inula, calendula and drawf sunflower today. Please give her a visit.

 

In a Vase on Monday: North Georgia Mountains

(c) Terri Robertson, T’s Southern Garden 2018

Today I’m posting from my family home on Pinnacle Mountain, just outside the quaint town of Clayton, Georgia.

It’s a sisters’ long weekend, and we’re about to head out to lunch, so I’ll make this quick!

The vase is the bottom part of a covered glass dish purchased at a nearby flea market. I’ve filled it with:

  • Berries—perhaps young wild blackberries
  • Daylilies
  • Pine branches
  • Queen Anne’s lace
  • Roses

To the either side of the vase, I placed:

  • Bark—covered with lichen and moss
  • Mountain laurel branch—dead, covered with lichen and moss
  • Rhododendron—foliage and bud
  • Rocks found on various family hikes

Thanks to Cathy and her blog, Rambling in the Garden, for hosting the IAVOM meme. It’s helped me connect to other garden bloggers and makes blogging much more enjoyable. Be sure to visit her post today (she has a nice rustic vase featuring Allium christophii) and the comments section to see what other gardeners around the world have put in a vase on Monday.

(c) Terri Robertson, T’s Southern Garden 2018

Thanks for stopping by! Please come again.

In a Vase on Monday: Succulents

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden 2018I’m in between summer and spring blooming seasons, so today’s In A Vase on Monday post is a pot of succulents.

This week I wrote a story about succulents for a local digital media outlet called Bham Now. The research for that story flowed over into real life, and brought me a great deal of tiny garden joy. This stoneware planter, a $2 estate-sale find, did not make the article, but I’m sharing it with you now.

Ripple jade

The tall plant in the center is ripple jade (Crassula arborescens subsp. undulatifolia). I thought it was a steal for $3.95 at Oak Street Garden Shop in Birmingham, Alabama. Something about the shape and watery green color of the leaves is mesmerizing.

Oak Street Garden Shop maintains a community pollinator garden outside its shop in Crestline Village. (Nothing to do with succulents, of course, but I had to include it.) The owner tells me that goldfinches feast there in the morning, in addition to the bees and butterflies who visit all day.

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden 2018
Black-eyed Susans are the stars of this pollinator garden in June. Seedlings of zinnias and cosmos are popping up among the fading larkspur and bachelor buttons, which are going to seed.
Peperomia prostrata

The plant spilling over the side to the back-right is Peperomia prostrata. I bought a tiny pot for $5.95 at the same shop, and I divided it among three different planters.

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden 2018

Single-leaf propagations

The two tiniest plants in my pot of succulents are the result of single-leaf propagation. I don’t know the names of the specific varieties, unfortunately. These baby succulents are 8 months old, starting from the date I snapped off the parent leaves.

 

Propagated cuttings

The remaining two plants in the stoneware planter are propagated cuttings (I do not have a record of the plants’ names). Below is one of the original plants, which is in bloom at the moment.

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden 2018

Thanks to Cathy and her blog, Rambling in the Garden, for hosting the IAVOM meme. Check out her lovely offering today of sweet peas, cosmos and grasses, and visit the comments section to see what other gardeners around the world have put in a vase on Monday.

In a Vase on Monday: Sweet Gardenias

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018

The guest room smells amazing today thanks to the small vase of gardenias clipped for today’s In a Vase on Monday post.

Frostproof gardenias (Gardenia jasminoides)

I’ve written before about the drought that claimed quite a few of my plants and shrubs in 2016-17. I dragged my feet about replanting shrubs in the largest front bed, but I finally got the job done this year. I opted for a frostproof variety of gardenias, which are full sun and drought tolerant. The bushes started flowering last week, and they smell ever so nice. Gardenias have a heavy, sweet scent, but it’s not overpowering.

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
A gardenia in bloom. Ahhhh, breathe it in.

Colorwheel, aka Stokes’ Aster (Stokesia laevis)

The colorwheel bloom in last week’s post got a couple of comments, so this time I’m including a photo of new versus old blooms. The palest bloom opened most recently; the others have darkened with age.

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
Colorwheel, aka Stoke’s aster, blooms deepen in color with age.

“Hot Lips” sage (Salvia x jamensis) 

The small white flowers tipped in red are “Hot Lips” sage or saliva. A couple of varieties of perennial salvia are shown in the photo below. I’ve caught a glimpse of a ruby throated hummingbird a few times this spring—apparently they love salvia!

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
Salvia = hummingbird magnet

Thanks to Cathy and her blog, Rambling in the Garden, for hosting the IAVOM meme. It’s helped me connect to other garden bloggers and makes blogging much more enjoyable. Be sure to visit her blog and the comments section to see what she and other gardeners around the world have put in a vase on Monday.

 

In a Vase on Monday: Kangaroo Colorwheel

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018

Last week, I noticed a few garden bloggers chose fun animal vases for In a Vase on Monday. This week, I follow suit.

Kangaroo Vase

This vintage Fitz & Floyd piece is actually a toothbrush holder. As a vase, the holes meant for toothbrush handles function like a flower frog, helping stems stay in place. This is not the first time this estate-sale find has appeared on my blog, but it is its first appearance since I began posting for IAVOM, hosted by Cathy at Rambling in the Garden.

Colorwheel, aka Stokes’ Aster (Stokesia laevis)

The pastel, almost white bloom by the kangaroo face is the very first offering from my Stoke’s Aster this season. This perennial, full-sun plant is native to the Southeastern United States. It earns the nickname Colorwheel from the changing color of its blooms, which begin as the palest pink-purple and age to a deep mauve.

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
An overhead view offers a closer look at the Stoke’s Aster bloom (bottom left).

Rounding out the colorwheel: repeat bloomers

The rest of the blooms in this vase have already appeared in various posts this year, and you will probably continue to see them in my vases through the summer.

  • The spindly brown stems bearing tiny white flowers are heuchera ‘Mocha’ also known as coral bells.
  • The clusters of small purple flowers are lavender (Lavandula angustiflolia).
  • With a truly ice-like shimmer, the neon violet flowers are ice plant (Delosperma cooperi).
  • The violet, cone-shaped clusters are butterfly bush (Buddleja), and speaking of …

The butterfly bush below our kitchen window went from one single bloom last week to full-blast flowering this week. Bring on the butterflies!

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
Butterfly bush

More animal vases

Last week, posts from these bloggers inspired my kangaroo creation.

  • Wild Daffodil, hailing from the other side of the Atlantic on England’s south coast, featured zebra and giraffe vases.
  • In Florida, the Shrub Queen arranged native wildflowers in a cow vase and introduced us to a sweet real-life pup.
  • Bonney Lassie, of Washington state, has a fish vase that I adore.

More In a Vase on Monday

Visit Rambling in the Garden to see what Cathy and gardeners around the world have put in a vase this Monday. Thank you for stopping by!

 

In a Vase on Monday: Welcome May

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
Red hot poker (yellow flower), butterfly bush, ice plant and Carolina snailseed

This week, vibrant new blooms join the spring party and the Carolina snailseed is being super clingy.

Today’s post is part of “In a Vase on Monday,” a weekly meme hosted by Cathy on her blog Rambling in the Garden. Give her a visit to see what she and other gardeners around the world have put in a vase today. But first, here’s what’s in my vase on Monday, May 7, 2018, in Birmingham, Alabama.

Red hot poker (Kniphofia uvaria ‘Grandiflora’)

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
Red hot poker

Also known as torch lily, this perennial is another purchase from the Birmingham Botanical Gardens fall plant sale in 2017. This is its first (and only) bloom, so I hope more blooms are on the way. It’s a native of Southern Africa, and from what I read, its blooms are often bi-colored in combinations of yellow, orange and red. I’m not sure if my plant will offer only yellow blooms, or it’s going to surprise me.

Butterfly bush (Buddleja)

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
Butterfly bush

We planted a butterfly bush under our kitchen window last year. True to its name, it attracts lots of butterflies. It’s covered in green buds this week, which will soon turn into dark violet-purple blooms. Although not fully bloomed, this one was far enough along to demonstrate its color.

Ice plant (Delosperma cooperi)

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
Ice plant

I also featured this succulent ground cover in my IAVOM post on April 23.  It’s really doing well this year, so you will probably see it in my arrangements throughout the summer. Look how the petals shimmer in the sun.

Carolina snailseed (Cocculus carolinus)

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
Carolina snailseed

When looking for vase ideas today, I was taken by how these young shoots of Carolina snailseed twisted together to achieve verticality. It reminds me of Jack and the Bean Stalk.

Thanks for dropping by my blog today, and don’t forget to visit Cathy at Rambling in the Garden for more IAVOM posts.

Correction: An earlier version of this post incorrectly identified the Carolina snailseed as English ivy (Hedera).