In a Vase on Monday: Big, Beautiful Lily

(c) Terri Robertson, T’s Southern Garden 2018
Asiatic lily, hummingbird mint, dusty miller, sedum and creeping Jenny

This spring, I planted a bargain variety pack of shade bulbs and roots. The big, beautiful Asiatic lily in this vase is the summer payoff.

It’s the only flower so far, but perennials can take a couple of years to put on a show. (And I probably could have taken more care in preparing the soil before planting.) Now, for the rest.

Creeping Jenny

(c) Terri Robertson, T’s Southern Garden 2018

I love creeping Jenny and the dimension it brings to vases. It’s easy to dig up and transplant, and it comes back every year. From late spring to the first killing freeze of winter, it cascades over our terrace walls and softens the edges of the austere concrete blocks.

“Apache Sunset” hummingbird mint (Agastache rupestris)

(c) Terri Robertson, T’s Southern Garden 2018

I’m pleased with how big and bountiful this perennial has become in its second year in my garden. Hummingbird mint is said to attract hummingbirds, but I haven’t exactly been watching for them. It’s hot as Hades outside, and we’ve had monsoon-like rains.

Dusty miller

(c) Terri Robertson, T’s Southern Garden 2018

Dusty miller is one of those plants that’s so ubiquitous in gardens (at least in the Southeastern U.S. where I live) that it’s easy to dismiss. But I must give credit where credit is due. It’s a hardy perennial, and the white, waxy foliage really highlights the lily.

Sedum

(c) Terri Robertson, T’s Southern Garden 2018

The sedum is a “passalong” from my dad. I wish I knew the variety. Like the creeping Jenny, it’s a perennial saving grace for the concrete block terraces. Planted in the openings along the top, it propagates easily and comes back every year.

Vase and props

I inherited the vintage glass creamer (the vase) from my aunt. It could be a family piece, or perhaps she scouted a deal for 25 cents at a flea market, as she was so good at doing. For the photo, I added a vintage brass finial and a small woodblock painting by Moni Hill, which my sister bought for me at the Main Street Gallery in Clayton, Georgia. There’s a quote on the side of the painting, too.

(c) Terri Robertson, T’s Southern Garden 2018

Thanks to Cathy and her blog, Rambling in the Garden, for hosting the IAVOM meme. She has a sunny vase of zinnias, inula, calendula and drawf sunflower today. Please give her a visit.

 

Native Woodland Garden (Part 1)

I love the urban wilderness of our backyard, but the truth is it’s filled with non-native, invasive plants that have been left to their own devices for decades.

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My woodland garden against the backdrop of an urban wilderness

Close to the city, shaded by trees, private. There are many reasons I am fond of our little chunk of paradise. Thickets of Chinese privet, blankets of English ivy and roving wisteria vines are not among them. (These plants are pretty, of course; they’re just not so great in a foreign land where they compete fiercely and choke out everything else.)

The journey to restoring the back section of our property to something resembling a native Alabama woodland will be a long one. I have a lot to learn and even more to do. For the time being, I am doing the only thing I can—starting small. The tiny patch you see in the photo at the top of this post has been one year in the making. It’s a humble beginning, but I hope it will be the first of many chapters in this story.

Before I tell you about the plants, I’d like to point out two events where you can purchase native plants, for shade or sun, if you live in or near Birmingham, Alabama.

To date, I’ve planted the following native Alabama perennials in my woodland garden.

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
Solomon’s seal (Polygonatum biflorum)

Solomon’s seal (Polygonatum biflorum): This was my first purchase for the woodland garden last spring, and I’m happy to see it back and thriving this year. You can see flower buds hanging from the largest stem. I can’t wait to show it again when it’s in bloom.

  • Light requirements: shade/part shade
  • Soil requirements: moist
  • Size: 1-3 feet
  • Flowers: white, April-May
  • Rhizomes
  • Attracts birds and butterflies
(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
Purple trillium (Trillium cuneatum)

Purple trillium (Trillium cuneatum): I have long observed and admired this plant along nature trails, and I’m a little giddy about having one. Plus, it has cute nicknames, including little sweet Betsy, toadshade and whip-poor-will flower. I just purchased it, so I missed bloom season this year.

  • Light requirements: shade
  • Soil requirements: moist, woodsy humus
  • Size: 10 inches
  • Flowers: maroon, March
  • Rhizomes

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Bleeding heart (Dicentra eximia)The blooms are small, but so pretty. The foliage is delicate and feathery. I accidentally broke off a stem during planting, and I am now attempting to root it.

  • Light requirements: shade
  • Soil requirements: moist, rich woodlands humus
  • Size: 18 inches
  • Flowers: pink, spring-summer
(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
Alabama phlox (Phlox pulchra)

Alabama phlox (Phlox pulchra): I purchased three of these when I found out they are rare in the wild. This species will have a little haven in my yard.

  • Light requirements: shade
  • Soil requirements: average
  • Size: 12 to 14 inches
  • Flowers: pink, April-May
  • Rare in wild
(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
Bottlebrush buckeye (Aesculus parviflora)

Bottlebrush buckeye (Aesculus parviflora): I planted this shrub off to the side of the garden since it will grow quite large in the years to come. It’s in the sun at the moment, but won’t be once the oak tree above it leafs out.

  • Light requirements: part/full shade
  • Soil requirements: average, humus rich
  • Size: 8-10 feet
  • Flowers: white
  • Deciduous multistem shrub
  • Attracts butterflies
(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
Suggested ID: Resurrection Fern (Pleopeltis polypodioides)

Resurrection fern (Pleopeltis polypodioides): This is the one plant I did not buy. It fell, along with the branch, from an oak tree in the yard about a year ago. I actually have a few such branches, and I placed the two largest on either side of the woodland garden as a border. This fern shrivels in dry weather and bounces back after a good rain. I feel pretty confident about this ID, but I will update this post if the iNaturalist community produces another ID.

I hope the plants I’ve introduced to my woodland garden thrive and multiply as I continue to clear invasive species and bring in more native plants little by little. What native plants do you have in your gardens at home?