Wednesday Walk

To capture April in Alabama I’m venturing beyond my garden. I took these snapshots during a recent neighborhood walk in Birmingham.


(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
This oak-lined street is a piece of Americana perfection.

When oak trees first leaf out, their young green leaves shine in the sun as if golden. It always makes me think of Robert Frost’s poem “Nothing Gold Can Stay,” which begins “Nature’s first green is gold.” I love the sight of a huge oak five times the size of the house it grows beside.

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
A tree-lover’s ideal tree-to-house ratio
(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
Oak tree canopy against a blue sky

The wildflowers (or weeds, if you rather) are out.

The flattering name of this plant is, wait for it, Philadelphia fleabane. I saw this member of the daisy family today blooming along nonresidential roadsides and in natural areas. It may look a little weedy, but it’s native to North America. (In Europe and Asia, where it has been introduced, it’s considered invasive.)

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
Suggested ID: Philadelphia fleabane (Erigeron philadelphicus)

A friend once told me dogwood trees should look like clouds in the landscape.

I have to agree. This dogwood in bloom looks exactly like a cirrus cloud floating in the sky.

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
Dogwood tree in April
(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
Dogwood blooms

Japanese maples offer vibrant color at a time of year when most everything is green, white or pastel.

I recently wrote about my Shaina Japanese maple, which is a dwarf variety. On today’s walk I encountered medium and large varieties.

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
Japanese maple with tall sculptural trunk
(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
Japanese maple
(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
Maple, sidewalk understory view, in April

Magnolias bloom in the summer, but their dark, glossy leaves and massive trunks are beautiful all year.

The low-hanging branches of the magnolia below are so inviting. I will be sure to revisit this tree in the summertime when it is in bloom.

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
Magnolia tree
(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
Another example of a tree-lover’s ideal tree-to-house ratio (magnolia edition)
(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
My mom carried a bouquet of magnolias at my parents’ June wedding decades ago. This photo, taken this April, shows a bud in progress.

I believe I encountered an azalea that is native to Alabama!

If my ID is correct, this azalea is a pinkster flower (Rhododendron periclymenoides). If I get another ID from the iNaturalist community, I will update this post. I spotted this small shrub growing wedged in a tall, groomed evergreen hedge. It seemed out of place in the best way possible. 

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
Suggested ID: pinkster flower (Rhododendron periclymenoides)

The topography of Birmingham can vary fairly dramatically within a small radius.

My neighborhood is all steep hills. The area I walked today (the adjacent neighborhood) is flat and carved with natural creeks and urban waterways.

(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
Urbanized creek bed
(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
This creek bed is nearly dry, but it must carry a lot of water during storms.
(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
What if this were your driveway?
(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
A rocky outcropping and babbling creek belie the residential setting (see the street view below).
(c) Terri Robertson, T's Southern Garden, 2018
Can you spot the hidden creek? (Hint: It’s to the left of the sidewalk. I drove on this road for years without noticing it.)

Thanks for visiting. I’d love to see what spring looks like in your neighborhood, wherever that may be.

 

Author: Terri Robertson

I am a freelance writer, editor and creative concept developer. I'm also a novice gardener who creates arrangements using cuttings and plants from my yard, vintage containers, and found objects both natural and manmade.

2 thoughts on “Wednesday Walk”

  1. Thanks for taking me on your beautiful walk! Fab oaks, wildflowers (there’s no such thing as a weed, is there 😉 ) and that Rhododendron is just delightful. Spring is hesitating this year but next week it’s supposed to get very hot, so maybe we jump right into summer.

    Liked by 1 person

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